The art of the hand-sell

hand-sell

Hand-selling books isn’t for introverts so if that describes you, stop reading now. This article will make you anxious.

Whether you’re hand-selling to bookstore employees so they will, in turn, hand-sell your book or you’re hand-selling directly to readers, you need to be your best extroverted self. That’s because hand-selling your book requires confidence and courage supported with planning and preparation.

You’ll be hand-selling your book at bookstore and book signings at other venues, at book fairs, or when you speak to groups.

When hand-selling, you have one goal: To sell as many copies of your book as possible.

That takes work. Here are a few tips for better hand-selling.

A few words on rejection

author rejection

An author friend, Rachel*,  is a gifted writer.

Truly, truly gifted.

Every time she sends her new novel to a mainstream traditional publisher, she receives a personal rejection.

But a personal rejection is better than what most authors receive — silence or a form letter — right?

Book review: 5-Minute Marketing for Authors

marketing for authors

The bubbles above the title on the cover of 5-Minute Marketing for Authors: Get More Sales for Your Books in Just 5 Minutes a Day by Barb Asselin hint that it could use another phrase at the end of the subtitle: “by Using Social Media.” 

This free, short (62 pages) Kindle book is a helpful resource for new authors who have limited book promotion time and choose to use it on social media. The overview of KDP Select’s free days and Kindle countdowns is helpful for anyone who hasn’t been exposed to that piece of the Kindle puzzle yet.

Why you need both CreateSpace and IngramSpark

em>Amy Collins, New Shelves BooksBecause Amy Collins and I live just a few miles apart, we’re able to meet regularly for tea and shop talk. Today’s guest post came from a conversation last week over a cup of Earl Grey and a vanilla chai latte. Amy is the former director of sales at Adams Media and special sales director for its parent company, F+W Media. In 2006, she started the successful book sales and marketing company, New Shelves Books. Over the years, she has sold to Barnes & Noble, Target, Costco, Borders, Books-A-Million, and Wal-Mart and become a trusted partner and recommended sales consultant for some of the largest book and library retailers and wholesalers in the industry. In the past 20 years, Amy has sold more than three million books into the bookstore, library, and chain store markets for small and mid-sized publishers.

Why you need both CreateSpace and IngramSpark

By Amy Collins

I have been asked one question more than any other: “Do I need IngramSpark if I have CreateSpace?”

I know it’s tempting to avoid the extra expense and hassle of taking on a second print on demand (POD) provider, but I want to take a moment and share some of the experiences we’ve had at New Shelves Books with our POD work.  I hope these statements help you determine if you need one or both.

So . . . do you need both?

Meghann Foye and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Bad book publicity 2

Have you heard about the controversy swirling around Meghann Foye’s new novel, Meternity?

Foye’s book about a woman who fakes a pregnancy so she can enjoy all the wonderfulness that comes with a maternity leave (cough cough) has gotten lots of attention.

LOTS.

Here’s why, pulled straight from the book description on Amazon:

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