Category Archives: Tools

Are you guilty of these author press kit blunders?

author press kit

What’s in your online author press kit and how is it presented?

If you’re looking for book publicity — free media exposure — you have to:

  • Have an author press kit on your website
  • Include the right elements with the right information
  • Present it in a format that’s easy for all journalists to use

Are you making any of these common author press kit mistakes that are interfering with your ability to effectively promote your book? Don’t worry if you are — all of these can be fixed easily:

Expand your audience exponentially with smart Goodreads marketing

Expand your audience exponentially with smart Goodreads marketing

Our guest blogger on smart Goodreads marketing is Kate Sullivan, a professional book designer, editor, and the web editor of TCK Publishing, an independent press dedicated to helping writers make the most out of their author careers. I’m a fan of TCK’s podcast for authors, “The Publishing Profits Podcast Show,” too.

Expand your audience exponentially with smart Goodreads marketing

smart Goodreads marketingBy Kate Sullivan

By now, most of us book people are familiar with Goodreads. It’s an amazing place to keep track of what you’re reading, what you want to read next, and everything to do with the bookish life. And since most authors are also avid readers, we tend to have our digital bookshelves well stocked and we regularly update our reading progress, reviews, and more.

Many of us also have our author profiles set up and have our Facebook and Twitter accounts linked to Goodreads. Heck, maybe you’ve even synced your blog to your Goodreads author page through RSS.

These are all fantastic ways to start leveraging the power of Goodreads’ massive audience to promote your books—but there’s more you can do to take advantage of all those eager readers just looking for the next great book to read.

Let’s look at a few ways—some free and some paid—to connect with the 55 million Goodreads members who might just love your book.

3 Amazon reader review myths: What you need to know

reader review myths

Authors are asking for and receiving advice from other authors about how to get reader reviews.

Much of the advice is excellent. Some of the most helpful information comes from the “here’s how I did it” stories that many are willing to share in online discussions and in person.

Not all of the advice rings true, though. That’s understandable, because it seems like the “facts” do change regularly. Still, repeating information without verifying it first sometimes adds to the confusion.

On the other hand, some of it is hard to verify. For example, there’s a lot of discussion around reader reviews being removed from Amazon. People speculate that it happens when Amazon identifies social media connections between a reviewer and the book’s author, but I have yet to see Amazon verify that, even though it seems likely to be true.

Other specifics can be confirmed or refuted, though. Here are three Amazon review “myths” and what you need to know about them.

Get a better author photo without spending a fortune

author photo

Raise your hand if you’ve seen a bad author photo on an author’s website or used in a social media profile recently.

My hand is up.

I’ve seen photos where the author is just staring into a webcam. No smile. No warmth. Just a stare.

Then there are the smartphone selfies. (What adult has actually mastered the art of the selfie?)

Sometimes you can tell that another person standing next to the author has been cropped out.

Other times, the author is joined in the photo by someone else — usually a spouse — who isn’t cropped out.

Who are your key influencers?

key influencers

Who are the people who can help you sell more books?

I got thinking about this after interviewing an expert for a magazine article last week. My source mentioned that his company had recently acquired another firm that specialized in connecting brands with “influencers” — influential bloggers.

The companies or brands advertise on the blogs or pay the bloggers to write “sponsored” posts about the brand and its products or services.

There’s transparency, of course — the bloggers state that they’be been paid to try and/or write about the brands.  Ethics obligate the bloggers to be honest, but so do their relationships with their readers. They know that their fans count on them to provide information they can trust.

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