Search Results for: publicity

Get book publicity with HARO

HARO

Want free book publicity? Subscribe to Help a Reporter Out — HARO.

HARO is a free daily email service that connects journalists with sources. The 800,000-plus people who use it receive three e-mails a day loaded with queries from journalists who describe what they’re looking for in a source and why.

If you make the effort to scan those emails for opportunities to contribute your expertise or experience, you and your book could be mentioned in the news or on a blog.

The trick to getting an interview and subsequent exposure — all of which you don’t pay for — is responding to the right queries appropriately. More on that later, though. It helps to first understand more about HARO and how the system works.

How to create a book publicity tip sheet

tip sheet

When Irish children’s author Avril O’Reilly sent a tip sheet to media outlets throughout Ireland, she had immediate success that included newspaper and television exposure for her book, Kathleen and the Communion Copter.

In her tip sheet, O’Reilly offered parents advice for selecting just the right Communion gift for little girls. While her book is fiction, she was able to find a nonfiction nugget she could use to create a tip sheet that offered the media useful information they could use immediately.

3 tips for generating article ideas for book publicity

generating article ideas

Getting publicity — news media exposure — for your book is all about generating article ideas and segment concepts that will resonate with the media outlet’s audience.

You present — “pitch” — those ideas to the right media outlets as a way to get interviewed. You’re identified in the article or segment as the author of Insert Your Book Title Here. Your book, of course, is the credential you need to be interviewed on that topic.

Many authors in full-on promotion mode understand this. They know that the fact that they’ve written a book isn’t enough to attract media attention. These authors realize they have to be pro-active about contacting the press with a newsworthy angle.

They get it.

What they struggle with — and maybe this describes you, too — is generating the article and segment ideas they can use to snag the interviews that will get them that priceless media exposure.

Opportunistic book publicity: Leverage what’s in the news

The House

This Friday, June 30, the new comedy “The House” hits theaters in the U.S.

Starring Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler, the movie’s about what happens when parents who have blown their daughter’s college fund start an illegal casino in their basement to generate enough money to cover her higher education expenses. (Hilarity ensues!)

If you’ve written a book on how to pay for college, you should be capitalizing on the buzz around this movie starring two bankable comedians. (More on that in a moment.)

In general, you always want to look for ways to link your book to current events, whether it’s breaking news, celebrity gossip, or, as in this case, a movie that’s getting a lot of attention. It’s about being opportunistic — the opportunity presents itself and you grab it to get book publicity.

How to get trade journal book publicity

trade journal book publicity

In an earlier post, “Trade journals: The book publicist’s secret weapon,” I wrote about trade journals and how they might fit into your book marketing plan. Today’s post expands on that by detailing the steps to follow to get trade journal book publicity.

A quick reminder about publicity: Publicity isn’t advertising. You can’t buy it; you can’t control it. Publicity is what you get when you’re interviewed for an article or on a talk show, or your book is mentioned in a short news item. “Trade journals: The book publicist’s secret weapon” lists the typical book publicity opportunities in trade magazines.

So how do you secure this exposure that means so much more to your book than paid advertising? Here are the six steps to follow.

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